Faster, Cheaper, Better – yes, you can have them all!

Faster, Cheaper, Better – yes, you can have them all! There are a few articles flying around that state for a product or service you have three fundamental options: Fast, Good and Cheap, but you can ever only choose two? When I first saw this, I thought, yep that’s about right. However, when this label started to get slapped onto every manner of product and service, something didn’t quite feel right. In fact, in today’s world, with the availability of agile and iterative tools and services, it is not fait accompli. Not only can you have all three attributes, but you should also be striving for Faster, Cheaper and Better. A mantra that continues to drive our business and now demanded of us! (Image Source) This is how it goes; you have the above three options for a product or service of which you can only ever choose either: Fast & Cheap, but not Good. Fast & Good, but not Cheap. Cheap & Good, but not Fast. So where did this come from? Its origins are in the project management triangle (left). A project manager’s tool used for defining and measuring a project goal. In short, it’s a planning tool to determine what the end product looks like. It now seems to be used by any incumbent in any industry which is being upset by disruption. In an article posted on business.com: “Fast, Good or Cheap. Pick Three?”. It argues that by applying an Agile and Lean process for product development, you can have all three. A statement that anyone who has worked in the SaaS industry knows to be exact! With...

Is your online research implementation terrible?

There are some great research and insight project implementations, including surveys and online Insight communities. However, there are also some terrible ones. So for the participants are about as exciting as reading a dictionary from A-Z or requiring an input which is as laborious as writing your name out a thousand times. To be clear, you don’t have to entertain people when conducting research, but you do have to make it easy for them to participate and complete. When the participant or research respondent spends less time trying to understand what you’re asking the more time they have answering your questions. Whether you’re introducing a new survey or you’re setting up the guidelines for a five-day online insight community, never assume that the participant who is taking part knows what you’re anticipating. Sometimes we get so involved in the project that we’re creating that we communicate to the participant as if we were talking to one of our peers. So, here are some basic guidelines to help improve the usability of any research: Assume the respondent or the research participant knows nothing, behave as if you were introducing the research methodology. Use precise and plain language, and where ever you can dot points no higher than three will help frame your thinking to provide a clear and accurate message. If you can use imagery to help get the point across do so but don’t use imagery just because you think it looks nice, it has to have contacts and purpose. The last thing that you want to do is influence the research result by using an image to reframe...

User Experience issues in online market research

Do you collect feedback or customer insights? Did you test the online data collection experience first? Failing to check how your online market or social research set-up works with your target audience is likely to result in participant frustration and poor data collection. For those conducting their online surveys and online focus groups, a bad research participation user experience will deflate brand opinion and negatively skews the results. You only have to look at the Australian 2016 census survey fiasco to understand how a bad experience can lead to participant frustration. Look at some of the – not so rosy – comments received from participants completing online customer feedback and online research projects: “Why are you asking me to fill out this question, it’s not relevant to me?” “I can’t open this file, how am I supposed to comment on it?” “You haven’t told me how to share my video?” “Why am I getting this email and where did you get my name from?” “Oh, you didn’t tell me I needed a webcam!” “I can’t upload my file its in the wrong format, how do I convert it?” You may not even know you have created a user experience problem, or people are becoming frustrated by missing or poorly designed instructions. Most of the time participants will just give up or drop out. These kinds of issues mean you spend most of your day troubleshooting and redesigning the project when it should be running. Last minute changes don’t end well for the participant or customer and certainly doesn’t pan out well for you. How to minimise poor user experience...

5 steps to chat-based online focus groups success

Conducting a face to face, traditional style, focus group requires careful preparation to ensure the ninety-minutes spent with the panel of people is not wasted. Tasks such as checking your audio and video and making sure the refreshments are ready to be served.  You have people arriving in the waiting room where they are reading their consent slip, which explains their right and obligations by participating. The observers are already waiting for the group to start in another room looking at the group area through a one-way mirror or a video monitor. Just like traditional focus groups an online chat focus group takes the time to prepare but enables you to cut out a lot of the noise, expense, time, logistics and group dynamics. online chat focus groups are built for scale! Once you prepare for one group the easier, faster and cheaper it will be to conduct additional online focus groups. To get the most out of a chat-based online focus group follow these five steps for success. Schedule groups to run on a day and time that suits you and your participants. Forget about traffic and travel time, it’s no longer relevant, but do think about the times your participant’s might be sitting down to dinner or relaxing at home for the evening. Leave it too late and they become too relaxed and are likely to forgo participating at the last minute, start it too early you might not give them enough time to get home. Check with the recruiter, or the participants, what are the best times and choose a time which meets everyone in the...

7 Reasons chat online focus groups deliver insight

Chat online focus groups involves bringing a group of people together in a web browser environment at the same time to chat about ideas and questions guided by a structured discussion plan. In a traditional focus group, people might sit around a table or in close proximity in the same room, but in an online chat focus group people are sitting in their home or in any location that has internet access. The online focus group moderator manages the group over a sixty to ninety minute time frame by activating topics in a structured discussion plan. It’s as close as you can get to focus group chat automation using a real person to control the flow of the discussion and the depth of the participant responses – in real-time. People logged in to the online focus group express their views, thoughts and opinions in response to questions or topics through live text chat. You might ask people if they would purchase a proposed product or service, and why! What do you need to do to improve an offer so your target market would be more likely to buy or use your service? It goes without saying, these are the types of agile conversations you should be having with your target audience on a regular basis. Seven reasons why chat online focus groups work It is a perfect solution to engage a group of geographically dispersed participants of between 6 and 12 to get the answers you need on any topic. No need to wait for transcripts to be scribed form audio recordings the text chat transcripts are available right...