Agile research method – user experience diary

Obtaining real customer experience insights and not just making assumptions based on secondary (analytics data) is absolutely critical before finalising your concepts and requirements. There is no substitute for talking to real people about what you are proposing before investing real money in App or Website development. This article shows you how to use an agile user experience research method know as a user experience diary. Using an agile research user experience diary enables you to run ideas and concepts by a selected group from your target audience. An online user experience guided diary is a cost effective and time sensitive option to find out if people will understand and accept your idea. Agile methods of testing using online user experience guided diary enable you to set some tasks for individuals to complete over a particular period. The objective to confirm their needs and find out what works and what does not. You can ask a group of people from your user audience questions and present concepts to comment. From a user’s point of view, it is a one on one conversation with the diary and the organiser or moderator. You can also include a topic which includes wireframe images and selects a topic task to have individuals click on a website wireframe image based on a set of instructions you provided. The combination of both visual input and qualitative data in the form of comments provides both action and behavioural feedback Why an agile research user experience diary? Stay informed subscribe   First Name Please add your first name Email Address Please add your email address Submit A...

Agile testing of product and service ideas

“Test your ideas early and test them often!” a statement applied to both physical and digital products and services. When developing an idea into a product or service, it is far better to start testing at inception than wait until the horse has bolted. An idea evolved using co-creation, and agile testing is more likely to meet the needs and expectations of the target market. Agile testing of products or services shouldn’t be an afterthought, rather the cornerstone of your product development project plan. So why wouldn’t you test a product or service idea before going into full release? For large organisations, with established budgets, there aren’t any excuses. For small to medium sized businesses who work within fixed budgets – particularly start-ups – there are conflicting priorities, and it can be difficult to sell the value of pre-testing an idea. The discipline of agile testing can be especially challenging when dealing with entrepreneurial personalities, who tend to have an emotional attachment to the “next big thing”. For a person’s ego, it is a personal risk as well as a commercial one, especially if others shoot down the idea or financial backers push the founder to alter the idea from its original form. It’s only human nature not to want to hear your idea is not worth anything. For some, the personal attachment ‘s too great, and as a consequence, objectivity is thrown out of the window. But, the reality is that if it does not solve a real world problem, it’s just not going to fly. A failed product or service can be a costly exercise and leave...

Online surveys & discussions work hand in hand!

An online survey doesn’t always give you the depth of insight you might get from sitting down and having a two-way conversation with a person from your target audience. There is no doubt that online surveys are an easy way of facilitating a one-way question and answer session with many people at the same time, but it does require you first to craft one side of the conversation. There is a degree of guesswork involved because each question requires you to anticipate a response. It may seem counter-intuitive, but it does require you to have a good grasp of the intended audience and more importantly the objectives of you survey. Online surveys allow one way or asynchronous method of insight collection. Surveys are simply not built, or intended to facilitate two-way communication and engagement. Online surveys capture immediate responses and reactions to structured questions, but they do not promote the same level of discovery generated from a two-way (synchronous) post and answer discussion. Stay informedsubscribe First Name Please add your first name Email Address Please add your email address Submit Website and mobile survey environments train people to respond to questions according to a predefined response pattern, which means how the questions are structured and how they flow from one question to the next. In most cases, this tends to be short and sharp answer options framed by the question format. Surveys can also include open-ended text-based questions, where survey respondents type out a verbatim answer based on their interpretation of the question. People will often answer open text questions based on what they deem a ‘reasonable’ and ‘expected’...

Ultimate moderator’s guide: online focus groups.

There are typically two forms of real-time (live) online focus groups: the popular text chat online focus group and the video and audio online focus groups. Chat or text based online focus groups are a great way to start realising the benefits of using online focus groups. they are easy to set up and are very satisfying for participants who feel they are more part of an experience than a process. Reports and transcripts from the group discussion are available immediately. Webcam or video and audio based online focus groups are growing in popularity as internet speed and capacity increases. Video and audio groups require the participant to have access to a web camera and a set of earphones and a microphone. Not everyone is comfortable appearing on camera, but audio and chat focus groups provide a hybrid method for those topics which may require a little more personal sensitivity. How to plan a real-time (Live) online focus group discussion. Stay informed subscribe First Name Please add your first name Email Address Please add your email address Submit The success of your online focus group is determined by the time you spend preparing your research plan /discussion guide. Like most online research projects, putting together an online real-time group typically adheres to an 80/20 rule, with 80% of your time spent planning and the remaining 20% actually conducting the group. The GroupQuality® built in Plan Manager provides you with all the help and tools you need to design an online discussion guide. A discussion guide includes topics you post to the group to both initiate and guide the groups...

Text-Based Qualitative Data to Understand the Voice of the Customer

The “voice of the customer” (sometimes abbreviated as VoC) is a vital measurement for any marketing, sales or customer service activity. Without it you really have no idea if you are driving the business in the right direction. Qualitative data from customer conversations is a goldmine of insight waiting to be mined, and the only way to truly capturing the voice of the customer. While quantitative data obtained from online surveys helps you understand how a customer interacts with a brand. Qualitative textual data helps you understand the behaviour and motivation which defines a customer’s journey. We are surrounded by customer conversations and by using both unstructured and structured textual analysis we can finally hear what customers are saying about an organisations, brand, product or service. Text-based qualitative responses found in social media can help a brand identify the customer chatter that surrounds a product or service. But structured qualitative feedback can help you understand the ‘why’, ‘what’ and ‘when’ behind these conversations. Without this information, a disconnect could easily exist between how a business thinks customers perceive its products and services and what they actually think. Providing customers with the ability to provide structured qualitative feedback, can give a business a depth of insights not available through quantitative statistics alone. Only through qualitative data analysis can a brand understand the true depth of reactions, emotions and discourse that a product or service evokes. Why VoC is crucial It wasn’t that long ago that the term “voice of the customer” was first used. It originated in a 1993 paper by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor John R. Hauser and...

How does qualitative data add meaning to your quantitative analytics?

Businesses need to understand the context and meaning of quantitative data and analytics before using it to make decisions which effect the bottom-line. Qualitative insights are the prefect partner for quantitative analytics. The two approaches might seem like night and day, but in truth one is like a super power booster for the other.  With the advent of big data the push to use insights to predict consumer behavior has never been so great. But making decisions based on quantitative analytics alone, without first understanding the underlying motivation behind the numbers, is like driving a car at night without any headlights. Qualitative insights reveal the story behind the quantitative analytics. A business or organistion needs to be aware of how qualitative insights can complete the picture, and how to effectively capture, analyse and action those insights. By integrating qualitative data analytics into your business or marketing processes you add context and meaning to your insights and are able to drive informed decisions. So where do you begin? To keep it simple lets look at some of the ways people naturally make use of qualitative information, and how that process can lead to more formal decision making based on structured qualitative analytics. Identifying Response Trends Stay informedsubscribe First Name Please add your first name Email Address Please add your email address Submit While published critics use systems like “two thumbs up” or “4 out of 5 stars” to give concrete numbers to things like movies, in truth the evaluation is never that simple. Despite the complexity and nuance of someone’s opinion, overtime we can spot patterns in their responses based...