Online surveys & discussions work hand in hand!

An online survey doesn’t always give you the depth of insight you might get from sitting down and having a two-way conversation with a person from your target audience. There is no doubt that online surveys are an easy way of facilitating a one-way question and answer session with many people at the same time, but it does require you first to craft one side of the conversation. There is a degree of guesswork involved because each question requires you to anticipate a response. It may seem counter-intuitive, but it does require you to have a good grasp of the intended audience and more importantly the objectives of you survey. Online surveys allow one way or asynchronous method of insight collection. Surveys are simply not built, or intended to facilitate two-way communication and engagement. Online surveys capture immediate responses and reactions to structured questions, but they do not promote the same level of discovery generated from a two-way (synchronous) post and answer discussion. Stay informedsubscribe First Name Please add your first name Email Address Please add your email address Submit Website and mobile survey environments train people to respond to questions according to a predefined response pattern, which means how the questions are structured and how they flow from one question to the next. In most cases, this tends to be short and sharp answer options framed by the question format. Surveys can also include open-ended text-based questions, where survey respondents type out a verbatim answer based on their interpretation of the question. People will often answer open text questions based on what they deem a ‘reasonable’ and ‘expected’...

Ultimate moderator’s guide: online focus groups.

There are typically two forms of real-time (live) online focus groups: the popular text chat online focus group and the video and audio online focus groups. Chat or text based online focus groups are a great way to start realising the benefits of using online focus groups. they are easy to set up and are very satisfying for participants who feel they are more part of an experience than a process. Reports and transcripts from the group discussion are available immediately. Webcam or video and audio based online focus groups are growing in popularity as internet speed and capacity increases. Video and audio groups require the participant to have access to a web camera and a set of earphones and a microphone. Not everyone is comfortable appearing on camera, but audio and chat focus groups provide a hybrid method for those topics which may require a little more personal sensitivity. How to plan a real-time (Live) online focus group discussion. Stay informedsubscribe First Name Please add your first name Email Address Please add your email address Submit The success of your online focus group is determined by the time you spend preparing your research plan /discussion guide. Like most online research projects, putting together an online real-time group typically adheres to an 80/20 rule, with 80% of your time spent planning and the remaining 20% actually conducting the group. The GroupQuality® built in Plan Manager provides you with all the help and tools you need to design an online discussion guide. A discussion guide includes topics you post to the group to both initiate and guide the groups discussion....

Text-Based Qualitative Data to Understand the Voice of the Customer

The “voice of the customer” (sometimes abbreviated as VoC) is a vital measurement for any marketing, sales or customer service activity. Without it you really have no idea if you are driving the business in the right direction. Qualitative data from customer conversations is a goldmine of insight waiting to be mined, and the only way to truly capturing the voice of the customer. While quantitative data obtained from online surveys helps you understand how a customer interacts with a brand. Qualitative textual data helps you understand the behaviour and motivation which defines a customer’s journey. We are surrounded by customer conversations and by using both unstructured and structured textual analysis we can finally hear what customers are saying about an organisations, brand, product or service. Text-based qualitative responses found in social media can help a brand identify the customer chatter that surrounds a product or service. But structured qualitative feedback can help you understand the ‘why’, ‘what’ and ‘when’ behind these conversations. Without this information, a disconnect could easily exist between how a business thinks customers perceive its products and services and what they actually think. Providing customers with the ability to provide structured qualitative feedback, can give a business a depth of insights not available through quantitative statistics alone. Only through qualitative data analysis can a brand understand the true depth of reactions, emotions and discourse that a product or service evokes. Why VoC is crucial It wasn’t that long ago that the term “voice of the customer” was first used. It originated in a 1993 paper by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor John R. Hauser and...

How does qualitative data add meaning to your quantitative analytics?

Businesses need to understand the context and meaning of quantitative data and analytics before using it to make decisions which effect the bottom-line. Qualitative insights are the prefect partner for quantitative analytics. The two approaches might seem like night and day, but in truth one is like a super power booster for the other.  With the advent of big data the push to use insights to predict consumer behavior has never been so great. But making decisions based on quantitative analytics alone, without first understanding the underlying motivation behind the numbers, is like driving a car at night without any headlights. Qualitative insights reveal the story behind the quantitative analytics. A business or organistion needs to be aware of how qualitative insights can complete the picture, and how to effectively capture, analyse and action those insights. By integrating qualitative data analytics into your business or marketing processes you add context and meaning to your insights and are able to drive informed decisions. So where do you begin? To keep it simple lets look at some of the ways people naturally make use of qualitative information, and how that process can lead to more formal decision making based on structured qualitative analytics. Identifying Response Trends Stay informedsubscribe First Name Please add your first name Email Address Please add your email address Submit While published critics use systems like “two thumbs up” or “4 out of 5 stars” to give concrete numbers to things like movies, in truth the evaluation is never that simple. Despite the complexity and nuance of someone’s opinion, overtime we can spot patterns in their responses based...

What Value Does Online Qualitative Data Add For Businesses Compared To Quantitative Data?

In a business environment that generates millions of data points a day, qualitative market research has become more important than ever. Hard numbers can be generated faster and processed easier than ever before, yet the charts and graphs almost never tell the full story. A hundred million people might give the same response to a question but with a hundred million different reasons for “why.” Only qualitative data can flesh out the how and why of end-consumer responses. These insights give businesses the ability to look behind the scenes of quantitative data collection and give a story to those trend lines and pie charts. With the latest networking and qualitative research capturing, brands can have the answers and actionable responses they need to make important day-to-day decisions with less fear of the unknown. Quantitative vs. Qualitative Data — Yang to the Yin Market research and analysis gives your brand the power to not go into decisions blind. Almost everyone knows this fact, but how they react has become a bit too by-the-numbers, literally. They focus entirely on quantitative data as an ends, not a means. Services like social media, PPC and web hosting yield truckloads of information that can actually mean very little. Without a face and an opinion behind the data, misinterpretation or the false appearance of trends could lead brands astray. This shortcoming is where qualitative research comes in. Rather than merely “crunching numbers,” text-based, thoughtful responses can give specific reasons that drive consumer behavior. Businesses can use this information to enhance their decision making and bolster their data with insightful narratives. Only this type of deep...

Harvesting insights from your social media using complementary community discussion boards

It makes perfect sense for an organisation to build a social media following as a way of reaching out to current and potential customers. And there is no doubt that fans of a particular product or service will like an organisation’s Facebook page because it is a convenient and accepted way of engaging with an organisation’s brand. If you have a large social media following, you have probably invested a considerable amount of time, money and effort. But are you harvesting the full potential of your social media investment? Realising the full potential of your social media investment means going beyond just using Facebook as a communication channel. It is about using your social community to test and validate ideas, measure customer sentiment, brand opinion and pre-testing products, services and advertising campaigns. But, before you go ahead and jump in head first, and start posting images of your new top secret innovation, keep in mind that you are about to share those secrets with the world! How do use a Facebook community as a marketing insights tool, and how do you do it safely, securely and as an affordable alternative to building your own online private community? A market research online community (MROC), also known as a private online community, is like a private and secure Facebook page. A privately managed community of consumers that an organisation can invest in to engage with and ask questions. The disadvantage of private online communities is that they require a large investment to build, manage and maintain. In some instances costing hundreds of thousands of dollars year on year to properly resource...