Agile research method – user experience diary

Obtaining real customer experience insights and not just making assumptions based on secondary (analytics data) is absolutely critical before finalising your concepts and requirements. There is no substitute for talking to real people about what you are proposing before investing real money in App or Website development. This article shows you how to use an agile user experience research method know as a user experience diary. Using an agile research user experience diary enables you to run ideas and concepts by a selected group from your target audience. An online user experience guided diary is a cost effective and time sensitive option to find out if people will understand and accept your idea. Agile methods of testing using online user experience guided diary enable you to set some tasks for individuals to complete over a particular period. The objective to confirm their needs and find out what works and what does not. You can ask a group of people from your user audience questions and present concepts to comment. From a user’s point of view, it is a one on one conversation with the diary and the organiser or moderator. You can also include a topic which includes wireframe images and selects a topic task to have individuals click on a website wireframe image based on a set of instructions you provided. The combination of both visual input and qualitative data in the form of comments provides both action and behavioural feedback Why an agile research user experience diary? Stay informed subscribe   First Name Please add your first name Email Address Please add your email address Submit A...

How to reward online research participation

The most common question we get asked is how do you incentivise (reward) consumers, or participants, who have agreed to take part in an online research project. What do we pay them to maximise the contribution and ensure ongoing engagement? First of all let me say there isn’t any easy one-size-fits-all solution, or secret formula, to ensure people log-in regularly to an over-time discussion board, or turn up to a live online focus group. Even though incentive payments are important, as equally important is the regularity of contact you have with participants before and during your online research project. Typically, online focus groups, or online interviews, run between 60 and 90 minutes. When considering the incentive the first rule of thumb is to think about how you would incentives these people if they were participating in an old style face to face (physical) focus group. The message here is don’t assume because people are sitting in front of the computer at home, or in the office, you can reward them as little as possible. You need to incentivise individuals based on time, complexity and targeting of your project. But, I do acknowledge that participants’ save time and money not having to organise travel to a physical location. So let’s look at it this way, if you were to incentivise individuals $90 to be at a physical location for an hour, then you might decide to incentives 20% to 30% less. However, in the case of a group of professionals a reduced rate may not be appropriate. Online discussion boards, or mini communities, are a little bit different as they...

In-depth one-on-one online interview techniques

When it comes to capturing detailed insights about how particular consumer, employee or individual makes decisions, nothing beats qualitative marketing research. One useful technique for collecting qualitative insights is the online in-depth one-on-one interview. Whether you choose to run a structured online chat based one-on-one interview or a live web cam interview, using Group Quality you will uncover new insights and deliver immediate results. Online interviews are a great way to capture the opinions of hard to reach and time poor professionals. They also enable you to instantly capture and review top-line insights, which can be used to guide decisions early on in the product development life cycle. Online one-on-one interviews are unlike online surveys, in that the questions asked in a interview seeks to find out more detailed information about the thoughts, feelings, and perceptions of the participant. For this reason, most interviews have a very loose structure, unlike the relatively rigid structure of an online opinion poll. Interviewers should generally expect to spend between a half hour to an hour or more interviewing the participant. This will give the interviewer time to ask all of the questions they need to, and for the participant in the interview time to expand on each of their answers. Online one-on-one interviews have a key advantage when compared to an online focus group, or other form of qualitative study. In an online one-on-one interview, the only people involved are the interviewer and the interviewee. In this environment the interviewee is less likely to feel any pressure to conform to group opinion. And the answers they give are not influenced by the opinions expressed...